Medics Treat Array of Ailments at Water Follies - ABC FOX Montana Local News, Weather, Sports KTMF | KWYB

Medics Treat Array of Ailments at Water Follies

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 KENNEWICK, WA - Water Follies is all about having fun but safety is a top priority, too. That goes for drivers on the river, crews in the pits and you guys along the shores.

You can imagine what sort of characters the paramedics see over the weekend, but rest assured no matter what happens you are in good hands. Trios Health has been providing first aid at Water Follies for more than 25 years.

"Truly, it's a community service for us. We hire first aid providers, paramedics and EMT's, to come here and be here all day every day at Water Follies. So, it's our gift," said Lisa Teske of Trios Health.

That's a gift we should all be grateful for. One first aid tent is located near the Lampson Pits and the other is near the barge on the west end of Columbia Park.

"What we'll see here in the tent is minor first aid. If somebody comes in and they need more than that, Kennewick Fire Department is here so they will take the severe cases if we have them," said paramedic Gene Tolley.

"With a lot of sun, a lot of beverages flowing, things like that... It's really hard to enjoy it if you're not feeling well. So, health and safety first is kind of our thing and we're here to kind of pick up the pieces and help people get back to having a good time," said Teske.


"A lot of cuts, bruises, stings, blisters, lots of sunburns especially if it gets as hot as it's supposed to," said Tolley.

One thing you may not think about when it comes to safety at the boat races is your hearing. Medics said sometimes the air show and hydroplanes can be louder than a rock concert. You can pick up ear plugs, sunscreen and even water at the Trios Health first aid tents at any time. The two tents are fully staffed with up to four people at all times throughout the weekend.


"The water is fairly dirty. If you get cut down in the water on the rocks, get first aid as soon as possible. If it gets really hot, drink lots of fluids and try to alternate with a little electrolytes like Gatorade or Powerade," said Tolley.

Paramedics said they are most busy in between races. In fact, some patients will get up and leave before they are even treated when they hear that thunder on the river.

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