PHOTOS JUST IN: Devastation from Carlton Complex; 300 homes burn - ABC FOX Montana Local News, Weather, Sports KTMF | KWYB

PHOTOS JUST IN: Devastation from Carlton Complex; 300 homes burned

Posted: Updated:

TWISP, Wash. (AP) - The Okanogan County Sheriff says the Carlton Complex wildfire has many more homes than previously thought.

Sheriff Frank Rogers said Friday that the Carlton Complex fire has consumed about 300 homes this month. His office previously placed the number at 150, but he said then he knew it would rise because officials hadn't been able to reach some burned areas.

Rogers said he and his deputies have driven 750 miles of roadway through the devastated area, and "every road lost something." He said the blackened area looks like a moonscape, and he's seen hundreds of dead livestock.

The fire was started by lightning on July 14th and has burned about 400 square miles, becoming the largest wildfire in WA state history.

Photographer, Sy Stepanov gave us permission to share these devastating photos of the destruction caused by the Carlton Complex fire.

  • Top Stories from KHQHomeMore>>

  • AP FACT CHECK: Trump's alternate reality marks presidency

    AP FACT CHECK: Trump's alternate reality marks presidency

    Wednesday, January 17 2018 2:25 PM EST2018-01-17 19:25:03 GMT

    WASHINGTON - For all his errant swings at the facts, President Donald Trump sometimes gets it just right. "There's been no first year like this," he told a Florida rally last month. Were truer words ever spoken? This Department of Corrections has certainly never seen a first year like this.

    WASHINGTON - For all his errant swings at the facts, President Donald Trump sometimes gets it just right. "There's been no first year like this," he told a Florida rally last month. Were truer words ever spoken? This Department of Corrections has certainly never seen a first year like this. Falsehoods and exaggerations have tumbled relentlessly out of Trump's Twitter account, speeches and interviews, the vast majority in service of his ego. 

  • Following controversial suicide video, YouTube will now have humans review videos from most popular creators

    Following controversial suicide video, YouTube will now have humans review videos from most popular creators

    Wednesday, January 17 2018 12:21 PM EST2018-01-17 17:21:23 GMT

    NEW YORK (AP) - Google says humans will now review video from its most popular YouTube creators after recent complaints.   The videos being targeted are ones Google packages to advertisers as "preferred" content. While Google has had human reviewers before, it relies heavily on software to flag potential problems. YouTube was criticized for moving too slowly after one of its stars, Logan Paul, posted video of what appears to be a suicide victim.

    NEW YORK (AP) - Google says humans will now review video from its most popular YouTube creators after recent complaints.   The videos being targeted are ones Google packages to advertisers as "preferred" content. While Google has had human reviewers before, it relies heavily on software to flag potential problems. YouTube was criticized for moving too slowly after one of its stars, Logan Paul, posted video of what appears to be a suicide victim.

  • Divers discover possibly largest flooded cave on planet

    Divers discover possibly largest flooded cave on planet

    Wednesday, January 17 2018 12:07 PM EST2018-01-17 17:07:30 GMT

    KHQ.COM - A group of divers have connected two underwater caverns in eastern Mexico to reveal what is believed to be the biggest flooded cave on the planet. The discovery could help shed new light on the ancient Maya civilization. The project dedicated to the study and preservation of the subterranean waters of the Yucatan Peninsula, said the 216-mile cave was identified after months of exploring a maze of underwater channels.

    KHQ.COM - A group of divers have connected two underwater caverns in eastern Mexico to reveal what is believed to be the biggest flooded cave on the planet. The discovery could help shed new light on the ancient Maya civilization. The project dedicated to the study and preservation of the subterranean waters of the Yucatan Peninsula, said the 216-mile cave was identified after months of exploring a maze of underwater channels.

  • FIRE MODEMore>>

  • Charges brought against teen in Columbia Gorge fire

    Charges brought against teen in Columbia Gorge fire

    Thursday, October 19 2017 3:58 PM EDT2017-10-19 19:58:41 GMT

    HOOD RIVER, Ore. - Charges have been lodged against a 15-year-old boy who allegedly used fireworks to start a wildfire in Oregon's scenic Columbia River Gorge that burned out of control, triggering evacuations, the closing of an interstate highway and causing ash to rain down on nearby Portland. 

    HOOD RIVER, Ore. - Charges have been lodged against a 15-year-old boy who allegedly used fireworks to start a wildfire in Oregon's scenic Columbia River Gorge that burned out of control, triggering evacuations, the closing of an interstate highway and causing ash to rain down on nearby Portland. 

  • Large wildfire in Douglas County now 95 percent contained

    Large wildfire in Douglas County now 95 percent contained

    Sunday, October 1 2017 9:08 PM EDT2017-10-02 01:08:15 GMT

    DOUGLAS COUNTY, Wash. - Update, Sunday 6:15 p.m.: Washington State Patrol says the Whitehall Fire burning near Coulee City is now 95 percent contained as of Sunday evening. State mobilization resources have been released. Additional crews will be released Monday morning. 

    DOUGLAS COUNTY, Wash. - Update, Sunday 6:15 p.m.: Washington State Patrol says the Whitehall Fire burning near Coulee City is now 95 percent contained as of Sunday evening. State mobilization resources have been released. Additional crews will be released Monday morning. 

  • Montana wildfires: Rain and snow help but won't end season

    Montana wildfires: Rain and snow help but won't end season

    Saturday, September 16 2017 3:51 PM EDT2017-09-16 19:51:11 GMT

    HELENA, Mont. (AP) - Extra sleeping bags, heaters, coats and long underwear are sought-after commodities on Montana fire lines after rain, snow and cold replaced heat and smoke following about two rainless months. While the change in weather is welcome, it brings its own challenges for the crews fighting dozens of fires burning in drought-stricken Montana.

    HELENA, Mont. (AP) - Extra sleeping bags, heaters, coats and long underwear are sought-after commodities on Montana fire lines after rain, snow and cold replaced heat and smoke following about two rainless months. While the change in weather is welcome, it brings its own challenges for the crews fighting dozens of fires burning in drought-stricken Montana.

Powered by Frankly

Features

  • More Features
  • Powered by WorldNow
    All content © Copyright 2000 - 2018 Cowles Montana Media. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices.