Community demands 'Justice for Arfee' - ABC FOX Montana Local News, Weather, Sports KTMF | KWYB

Community demands 'Justice for Arfee'

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Arfee was shot by a Coeur d'Alene police officer last week while sitting inside a van. Arfee was shot by a Coeur d'Alene police officer last week while sitting inside a van.
COEUR D'ALENE, Idaho -

"Anonymous is watching and we stand united with you, the concerned public."

These were the words of someone claiming to be a part of the activist group named 'Anonymous'. They are the latest who have joined the Coeur d'Alene community in demanding justice for a dog named 'Arfee' who was killed by police on July 9th.

Coeur d'Alene police received a tip of a suspicious van in the parking lot behind Java, a coffee shop, on Sherman. An officer approached the van, gun in hand. That's when Arfee, originally identified as a pitpull, lunged at officers and was shot while still in the vehicle.

"It's very sad and it was very, very unnecessary and I know myself and many here in the community are upset with the way this whole thing was handled," Post Falls dog owner, John Williams told KHQ's Victor Correa on Monday. Williams shares the views of many locals who think the way police handled Arfee is unacceptable.

"To be taken by a member of law enforcement so needlessly, is going to get a lot of people upset."

In their YouTube video, Anonymous urges residents to come together, "We simply ask that you stand with us as we do all that we are able to assist in the good fight, the fight of freedom, safety, and security from the abuses of law enforcement and government intrusions into our lives."

This is a message many, like Williams, are putting at the forefront of a campaign they call "Justice for Arfee". All in the hopes of raising awareness for what happened and demanding answers for a man and his dog.

 

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