How Hanford Handles Possible Chemical Vapor Emergencies - ABC FOX Montana Local News, Weather, Sports KTMF | KWYB

How Hanford Handles Possible Chemical Vapor Emergencies

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On the Hanford site if a worker reports symptoms of chemical vapor exposure there is a protocol in place to act quick and get the person the help they need. On the Hanford site if a worker reports symptoms of chemical vapor exposure there is a protocol in place to act quick and get the person the help they need.
 HANFORD, WA – On the Hanford site if a worker reports symptoms of chemical vapor exposure there is a protocol in place to act quick and get the person the help they need.

If a worker believes that they have inhaled or somehow came in contact with dangerous vapors they either call 911 and a Hanford ambulance takes them straight to Kadlec or they report to the on site medical center. There they are checked out and tested in the exam rooms or possibly treated through what they call a containment process.

"If they're maybe just minimal symptoms they may be able to be returned back to work with or without restrictions. Each patients worker is assessed on an individual basis to determine whether or not they're able to return back to work," explained Karen Phillips from HPM Corporation, the medical team contracted directly through DOE to work at Hanford.

Phillips told NBC Right Now that most if not all of the 38 workers involved in the recent reports of possible chemical vapor exposure have returned to work. Some of them are still undergoing treatments.

In its entire history Hanford has seen 25,000 workers compensation claims totaling over 1 billion dollars paid out by the Department of Labor.  Any recent claims that could have stemmed from recent incidents are still pending.
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