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Authorities: New Hampshire Police Officer Shot To Death Before Explosion, Fire

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Authorities say a New Hampshire police officer was shot to death after he responded to a domestic disturbance at a home that later exploded and burned. (PHOTO: NBC) Authorities say a New Hampshire police officer was shot to death after he responded to a domestic disturbance at a home that later exploded and burned. (PHOTO: NBC)
BRENTWOOD, N.H. -

Authorities say a New Hampshire police officer was shot to death after he responded to a domestic disturbance at a home that later exploded and burned.

The gunman is presumed dead in the ensuing blaze.

Attorney General Joseph Foster says Monday night 48-year-old Brentwood Police Officer Steven Arkell was shot to death when he answered the call in a suburban neighborhood.

After the shooting, the house burst into flames. A massive explosion blew the front off the house and within an hour, it was leveled.

Foster says 47-year-old Michael Nolan, the son of the homeowner, is the suspected gunman. He is presumed dead.

A third person has been taken to a hospital.

(Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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