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Northwestern Players Vote On Union Question

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Football players at Northwestern University are casting secret ballots today on whether to form the nation's first union for college athletes. It's a vote that could mean sweeping changes for college sports. Football players at Northwestern University are casting secret ballots today on whether to form the nation's first union for college athletes. It's a vote that could mean sweeping changes for college sports.

EVANSTON, Ill. (AP) - Football players at Northwestern University are casting secret ballots today on whether to form the nation's first union for college athletes. It's a vote that could mean sweeping changes for college sports.

But the results won't be revealed any time soon. Instead, ballot boxes will be sealed for weeks or months -- perhaps even years -- as the university challenges the effort to unionize the football team.

The full National Labor Relations Board has agreed to hear an appeal of a March ruling from a regional director. He found that the players are employees, and can unionize.

There haven't been rallies or demonstrations on the 19,000-student campus. But there has been plenty of lobbying through private meetings, calls and emails.

Reporters today were kept away from the players as they entered a campus building to vote. One player shouted, "You got to give the people what they want!"

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