LOOK: Photos Of 'Blood Moon' During Total Lunar Eclipse - ABC FOX Montana Local News, Weather, Sports KTMF | KWYB

LOOK: Photos Of 'Blood Moon' During Total Lunar Eclipse

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On Tuesday, April 15, there will be a total lunar eclipse that will turn the moon a coppery red, NASA says. It's called a blood moon, and it's one of four total eclipses that will take place in North America within the next year and a half. On Tuesday, April 15, there will be a total lunar eclipse that will turn the moon a coppery red, NASA says. It's called a blood moon, and it's one of four total eclipses that will take place in North America within the next year and a half.
KHQ.COM - It was a sight to behold! The blood moon lit up the heavens Monday night. If you slept thru it, no need to worry! We recorded the whole thing for you and many of our Facebook friends and viewers have shared the photos that they captured of the total lunar eclipse!

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Sky-gazers in North and South America were treated to a full lunar eclipse - at least those fortunate enough to have clear skies.
   
The moon was eclipsed by the Earth's shadow early Tuesday, beginning around 1 a.m. EDT for 5 ½ hours. The total phase of the eclipse lasted just 78 minutes.
   
For some, the moon appeared red-orange because of all the sunsets and sunrises shimmering from Earth, thus the name "blood moon."
   
It's the first of four eclipses this year and the first of four total lunar eclipses this year and next. In the meantime, get ready for a solar eclipse in two weeks.
   
NASA got good news Tuesday: Its moon-orbiting spacecraft, LADEE survived the eclipse. Scientists had feared LADEE might freeze up in the cold darkness.


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