LOOK AT THE PHOTOS: NEW Crime Stoppers Fugitives - ABC FOX Montana Local News, Weather, Sports KTMF | KWYB

LOOK AT THE PHOTOS: NEW Crime Stoppers Fugitives

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Crime Stoppers Of The Inland Northwest released their newest batch of criminals for the week of April 10, 2014 Crime Stoppers Of The Inland Northwest released their newest batch of criminals for the week of April 10, 2014
SPOKANE, Wash. - Crime Stoppers released their latest batch of fugitives on Thursday.

This latest batch of fugitives are all wanted by law enforcement and are avoiding capture by police.

Crime Stoppers is asking anyone with information regarding where these fugitives are to call the Crime Stoppers Tip Line at 1-800-222-TIPS or forward tips to www.crimestoppersinlandnorthwest.org. There are cash rewards available and you don't have to give your name.

Yevgeniy Rudnitskiy
is a 25-year-old W/M wanted for Attempt to Elude. He is 5’8”, 215 lbs, has blond hair and blue eyes.

Cori Huartson is a 33-year-old W/F wanted for Identity Theft 2nd Degree. She is 5’2”, 235 lbs, has brown hair and green eyes.

Jesse Spears is a 23-year-old B/M wanted for Escape from Community Custody. He is 5’11”, 180 lbs, has black hair and brown eyes.

Ann Davis is a 32-year-old W/F wanted for Burglary 2nd Degree, Identity Theft 2nd Degree and Trafficking Stolen Property 2nd Degree. She is 5’4”, 110 lbs, has brown hair and brown eyes.

Aramis Turner is a 26-year-old B/M wanted for Escape from Community Custody. He is 5’10, 185 lbs, has black hair and brown eyes.

Heather Marchand is a 23-year-old W/F wanted for Taking Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission. She is 5’2”, 120 lbs, has red hair and blue eyes.

MOBILE USERS CLICK HERE TO VIEW PHOTOS: http://bit.ly/1n9XS2Z

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