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KHQ EXCLUSIVE: Inside The Carlile's Home; Victim's Wife Shares Her Nightmare

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James Henrikson James Henrikson
BISMARCK, N.D - Potentially huge news for the murder investigation of Spokane businessman Doug Carlile, the arrest of Carlile's business partner James Henrikson. It's very important to make one point loud and clear, James Henrikson is not under arrest for murder, but for a federal firearms charge.

We were the first television station to break the news of Henrikson's arrest around 3:30 Saturday afternoon. Carlile's wife and son quickly responded, with his wife saying, "Yes! thank you Lord! You do reign!", and his son shared the enthusiasm, saying, "I'm so glad, thank God." Homeland security took Henrikson into custody in Mandan, North Dakota just outside Bismarck.

The United States attorney's office released this statement about an hour ago, saying, "The arrest of James Henrikson today on allegations of illegal possession of firearms by a convicted felon should reassure the citizens of the oil patch that federal, state, local and tribal law enforcement are committed to working together to keep western North Dakota safe. I want to commend the hardworking and skilled agents who investigated this case and arrested the defendant this afternoon in Mandan without incident."

Again, Henrikson was not taken into on murder charges, but rather federal firearm charges, however, what he is charged with may change in the days and weeks to come. A potentially  big development in the Doug Carlile murder investigation as the man who detectives have said they believe was the mastermind behind this murder for hire is in custody in North Dakota.

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BISMARCK, N.D- James Terry Henrikson, 34, of Watford City, N.D., was arrested on federal firearms charges today in Mandan, North Dakota by agents from Homeland Security Investigations and the Bismarck/Mandan Metro Area Narcotics Task Force.

Mr. Henrikson is charged by Criminal Complaint in United States District Court, District of North Dakota, with being a felon in possession of several firearms in violation of 18 U.S.C. Sec. 922(g)(1). In Bismarck, United States Attorney for North Dakota Timothy Purdon said, "The arrest of James Henrikson today on allegations of illegal possession of firearms by a convicted felon should reassure the citizens of the oil patch that federal, state, local and tribal law enforcement are committed to working together to keep western North Dakota safe.

I want to commend the hardworking and skilled Agents who investigated this case and arrested the defendant this afternoon in Mandan without incident." This investigation was a joint investigation by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms & Explosives, Homeland Security Investigations, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the United States Postal Inspection Service, the Internal Revenue Service, North Dakota Bureau of Criminal Investigation, and the McKenzie County Sheriff's Office.

Purdon stressed that a Criminal Complaint is simply the method by which a person is charged with criminal activity and raises no inference of guilt. An individual is presumed innocent until competent evidence is presented to a jury that establishes guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. Assistant U.S. Attorney Gary Delorme is prosecuting the case.
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