West Yellowstone Businesses Seeing Slight Rebound After Shutdown - ABC FOX Montana Local News, Weather, Sports KTMF | KWYB

West Yellowstone Businesses Seeing Slight Rebound After Shutdown

WEST YELLOWSTONE -

West Yellowstone is seeing a slight rebound after the government shutdown forced Yellowstone National Park to close for 16 days.

ABC FOX Montana talked to the general manager of the Three Bear Lodge in West Yellowstone during the shutdown when people were canceling their reservations.

Since the government and park reopened last week, staffers say more people are calling and making reservations.

Some people who had reservations during the shutdown made new ones for last weekend.

Still, Three Bear Lodge general manager Travis Watt said people from foreign countries haven't come back.

"The ones that travel longer distances and international tourists, none of those came back, almost all local," said Watt.

Watt said they had just over 400 room nights canceled because of the shutdown.

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