Lubrecht Holds Demonstrations for Forestry Centennial - ABC FOX MONTANA NEWS, WEATHER, SPORTS - KTMF/KWYB

Lubrecht Holds Demonstrations for Forestry Centennial

Posted: Updated:
GREENOUGH -

The College of Forestry at the University of Montana celebrates its centennial with a wide range of events showing off their proud history and progress as they move into the future.

Students, faculty, alumni and staff invited the public to the Lubrecht Experimental Forest Thursday to show how the huge track of University land is really an outdoor classroom.

Thursday it was a buzz with the sound of chainsaws as the public learned how an education at the College of Forestry is just as much hands on as it is sitting at a desk.

"Lubrecht provides a laboratory for students to do research projects and engage in management activities," said Carl Seielstad, Associate Professor of Fire Science and Management.

"This is a working forest, it's been a working forest since it was donated to the College. It's a wonderful resource for students because faculty and students engage in a number of experiments and demonstrations some of which are in the positive and some are in the negative," Seielstad said.

Lubrecht Forest has been part of the University since it was donated from the Anaconda Mining Company in 1937.

Students have the opportunity to learn about forest ecology, watershed management, timber harvest, wildlife research and more.

"For silviculture and land management, we take inventories to see what's out there and take the measurements and do the math," said Jennifer Smith, a Resource Conservation student.

"It gives us an opportunity to compare what we do to what's been done in the past, because there's a record of the other students and scientists that have been up here so we can compare our research to what's been done in the past and see what's changing."

Thursday's demonstration involves thinning a stand of timber to mitigate the risk of fire and keep them generally healthy, a practice forest managers say could benefit different forests in Montana.

"We have fewer bureaucratic hoops to jump through in terms of getting land management done we actually host a lot of federal projects believe it or not, because it is so cumbersome to get some of the work done here done on federal land," Seielstad said.

In recent years, Lubrecht Forest has not been immune to the pine beetle epidemic or the lull in the timber market that made it hard for the school to make sales and generate revenue that helps sustain the program and make up forest costs.

But Seielstad hopes both are on an upward swing as beetle kill wanes and the market recovers.

"We're leaning hard on Lubrecht right now to  be self-sustaining and help us through these hard times over the next couple of years. But looking forward, Lubrecht's on a terrific trajectory."

The Centennial events will continue Friday and Saturday.

All day Friday, the public can head down to the Forestry Building on campus to check out memorabilia and oral history recording.

A campus dendrology tour departs Friday at 10 a.m.  from the Forestry Building. It is also free and open to the public.

From 11:30-noon, a graduate forestry seminar featuring guest speaker Dean Jim Burchfield will take place in the North Underground Lecture Hall is freeree and open to the public.

1-3 p.m.- Program displays: posters and conversation with current faculty and students on academic and research programs in Forestry Building Room 106. Free and open to the public.
· 5:30-9 p.m.: Evening banquet with video, slideshows and storytelling in the University Center Ballroom. Tickets cost $40 and are available to the public.

 On Saturday, Sept. 21 there will be a Forestry Griz football tailgate party before the Griz vs. Oklahoma Panhandle State game: Time and location available upon registration at the table on the first floor of the Forestry Building Thursday and Friday. Football tickets can be purchased at <http://www.griztix.com>. Ask for seats in the forestry block.

The Mike and Maureen Mansfield Library will host an ongoing special archival exhibit featuring the college's first 100 years. The exhibit will be on display in the Theta Rho Room on the fourth floor of the library.

The online exhibit can be viewed at <http://exhibits.lib.umt.edu/forestry>.
Visit <http://www.cfc.umt.edu/centennial/> for more details or to purchase tickets for the barbecue and banquet.

Families are welcome at all events. Call the college's Administrative Associate Jill Kinyon at 406-243-6754 to purchase tickets over the phone.

  • NationalMore>>

  • Varying health premium subsidies worry consumers

    Varying health premium subsidies worry consumers

    Thursday, July 24 2014 12:44 PM EDT2014-07-24 16:44:49 GMT
    Linda Close was grateful to learn she qualified for a sizable subsidy to help pay for her health insurance under the new federal law. But in the process of signing up for a plan, Close said her HealthCare.gov...
    Linda Close was grateful to learn she qualified for a sizable subsidy to help pay for her health insurance under the new federal law. But in the process of signing up for a plan, Close said her HealthCare.gov account...
  • Gov: Senator in plagiarism row deserves respect

    Gov: Senator in plagiarism row deserves respect

    Thursday, July 24 2014 12:38 PM EDT2014-07-24 16:38:53 GMT
    Sen. John Walsh said his unattributed use of others' work in his master's thesis was not plagiarism but "a few citations that were unintentionally left out of a term paper" that he blamed in part on...
    Montana Gov. Steve Bullock says he didn't know that Sen. John Walsh had plagiarized parts of his master's thesis when he appointed the former National Guard general to the Senate earlier this year.
  • Arizona execution rekindles death penalty debate

    Arizona execution rekindles death penalty debate

    Thursday, July 24 2014 12:38 PM EDT2014-07-24 16:38:21 GMT
    A condemned murderer took nearly two hours to die and gasped for about 90 minutes during an execution in Arizona that quickly rekindled the national debate on capital punishment in the U.S.
    The nation's third execution in six months to go awry rekindled the debate over the death penalty and handed potentially new evidence to those building a case against lethal injection as cruel and unusual punishment.
  • Most Popular

Powered by WorldNow

Features

  • More Features
  • Powered by WorldNow
    All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and Cowles Montana Media. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.