Bozeman Hotels Saw Great Summer - ABC FOX Montana Local News, Weather, Sports KTMF | KWYB

Bozeman Hotels Saw Great Summer

BOZEMAN -

Labor Day typically means another summer vacation has gone by. A new report said many people spent their summer vacations in Montana.

In fact, so many people came to Montana, it was nearly impossible to get a hotel room in Bozeman this summer.

"This has been possibly the best summer Bozeman has ever had," said Andrew Ash, Comfort Inn General Manager.

A Smith Travel Research report said Montana Hotel occupancy peaked at 82 percent in July, above the national average.

"Yes. We've been sold out at a hundred percent capacity," said Daryl Schliem, Bozeman Chamber of Commerce CEO.  "And that gets to be very hard because we get people that call that say ‘Where do we stay?'"

Ash noticed the same thing, even with the addition of two new hotels in Bozeman.

He said the Comfort Inn was full, even with prices going up 10 percent.

"2007-2008 was kind of the peak of the market and this year it is back to those levels for the first time in a long time," said Ash.

Ash said the improved economy helped a lot.

"It seems like the consumer is a lot more confident this year," said Ash.

Schliem said more people are going through Bozeman and the rest of the Gallatin Valley to get to Yellowstone National Park.

"They will be in Yellowstone National Park a day, maybe in Big Sky a day," said Schliem. "But at least capture one or two of those days and make sure Bozeman is on their picture."

Statewide, revenue from hotel rooms were up four percent this summer compared to 2012.

A portion of the "bed taxes" go towards many state funds, including state parks, universities, historical societies, heritage commissions and the arts.

Tourism in Montana brought in more than $3.5 million last year and supports more than 40,000 jobs statewide.

  • NationalMore>>

  • Koko the gorilla used smarts, empathy to help change views

    Koko the gorilla used smarts, empathy to help change views

    Thursday, June 21 2018 6:41 AM EDT2018-06-21 10:41:47 GMT
    Sunday, June 24 2018 5:16 AM EDT2018-06-24 09:16:41 GMT
    Koko, the gorilla who mastered sign language, has died in her sleep at the foundation's preserve in California's Sana Cruz mountains on Tuesday.
    Koko, the gorilla who mastered sign language, has died in her sleep at the foundation's preserve in California's Sana Cruz mountains on Tuesday.
  • Campers, bear escape Montana flood as severe weather hits US

    Campers, bear escape Montana flood as severe weather hits US

    Friday, June 22 2018 3:06 AM EDT2018-06-22 07:06:00 GMT
    Sunday, June 24 2018 5:16 AM EDT2018-06-24 09:16:28 GMT
    (Montana Army National Guard via AP). In this photo provided by the Montana Army National Guard, middle school students attending a Bible camp at the Montana Wilderness School of the Bible along the Rocky Mountain Front are guided onto a Chinook helico...(Montana Army National Guard via AP). In this photo provided by the Montana Army National Guard, middle school students attending a Bible camp at the Montana Wilderness School of the Bible along the Rocky Mountain Front are guided onto a Chinook helico...
    Helicopters have rescued people stranded by flooding in Texas and Montana, including 140 children and counselors stuck in a mountain bible camp for two days.
    Helicopters have rescued people stranded by flooding in Texas and Montana, including 140 children and counselors stuck in a mountain bible camp for two days.
  • Warming drives spread of toxic algae in US, researchers say

    Warming drives spread of toxic algae in US, researchers say

    Friday, June 22 2018 3:04 AM EDT2018-06-22 07:04:19 GMT
    Sunday, June 24 2018 5:16 AM EDT2018-06-24 09:16:17 GMT
    (Rick Egan/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File). FILE - In this June 12, 2018, file photo, a potentially toxic blue-green algae bloom in Provo Bay in Provo, Utah. Researchers and officials across the country say increasingly frequent toxic algae blooms ...(Rick Egan/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File). FILE - In this June 12, 2018, file photo, a potentially toxic blue-green algae bloom in Provo Bay in Provo, Utah. Researchers and officials across the country say increasingly frequent toxic algae blooms ...
    Toxic algae blooms are happening more often and lasting longer, including in drinking water reservoirs, and officials and scientists link their spread to climate change.
    Toxic algae blooms are happening more often and lasting longer, including in drinking water reservoirs, and officials and scientists link their spread to climate change.
  • Most Popular

Powered by Frankly

Features

  • More Features
  • Powered by WorldNow
    All content © Copyright 2000 - 2018 Cowles Montana Media. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices.