A Green Thumb Crime Tracker: Plants To Keep Thieves At Bay - ABC FOX Montana Local News, Weather, Sports KTMF | KWYB

A Green Thumb Crime Tracker: Plants To Keep Thieves At Bay

SPOKANE, Wash. 0 Before you plant this spring, consider buying defensive plants on your trip to the nursery. The right plant placed under your window can create a barrier between your house and a potential thief trying to peek inside your home. Spokane County Sheriff's Deputy Travis Pendell says the right defensive plant makes your home less attractive to thieves. The KHQ Crime Trackers took Deputy Pendell's list of recommended plants to Ritter's Nursery for a good look at the defensive shrubs. 

First on the list: a rose bush. The grandiflora and floribunda offer the heartiest stems with the largest thorns. Next, Deputy Pendell recommends a barberry. The plants require little maintenance and the off shoots grow several feet with thorns along the full length of them. Pyracantha is a noxious weed but is a good defensive plant. It grows pretty, white blooms but also grows prickly thorns that keep bad guys away.            

The Sheriff's Office says a well-lit yard will also make your house less attractive to potential thieves. However, the defensive shrubs planted in dark corners of your hard will keep lurkers from hiding in the shadows. 

Deputy Pendell adds that keeping your bushes trimmed is essential to your safety as well.  Junipers and arborvitaes grow thick and wide and can offer a spot for thieves to hide. It's therefore important that homeowners remember to keep those bushes trimmed and maintained.            

Again, plants are not going to fully protect your home from thieves. However, small additions like these defensive shrubs will act as one more layer of added protection in defense against potential criminals.

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